scamp

scamp
   ‘You little scamp’ would be addressed to a child in modern times, implying that he or she had been misbehaving, but that such misbehaviour was only to be expected from a young person. Parents who use the term may well be pleased that the child concerned is showing signs of liveliness. In the eighteenth century, when the word came into being, it was applied specifically to a highway robber. The latter was one who scampered away after committing his crimes. The word was quickly applied to any worthless person, then playfully applied to children.
   In The Pickwick Papers Tom is not alarmed when Bob Sawyer calls him ‘you idle young scamp’. adding ‘you vagabond’ and ‘you groveller’ for good measure. ‘Go to school, you little scamp’ says a man to a child in The House of the Seven Cables, by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The Australian children’s classic, Seven Little Australians, by Ethel Turner, has a young stepmother addressing her children as ‘you scamps, you bad wicked imps!’

A dictionary of epithets and terms of address . . 2015.

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  • Scamp — may refer to: * Scamp (Lady and the Tramp), a Disney cartoon puppy * Scamp, a type of lesser Daedra in The Elder Scrolls , appearing in several games of the series * SS 14 Scamp, the NATO reporting name for the RT 15 theatre ballistic missile of… …   Wikipedia

  • Scamp — Scamp, v. t. [Cf. {Scamp},n., or {Scant}, a., and {Skimp}.] To perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] A workman is said to scamp his work when he does it in a superficial, dishonest… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scamp — est à la fois le nom d un chiot, personnage de Disney, issu du film La Belle et le Clochard (1955) et une bande dessinée narrant son histoire. Le personnage Scamp Personnage Disney Espèce chien Sexe masculin 1re apparition dans …   Wikipédia en Français

  • scamp — scamp·ish; scamp; scamp·ish·ness; …   English syllables

  • Scamp — (sk[a^]mp), n. [OF. escamper to run away, to make one s escape. Originally, one who runs away, a fugitive, a vagabond. See {Scamper}.] A rascal; a swindler; a rogue. De Quincey. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scamp — [skæmp] n old fashioned [Date: 1700 1800; Origin: scamp to wander around (18 19 centuries), perhaps from scamper] a child who has fun by tricking people …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • scamp — ► NOUN informal ▪ a mischievous person, especially a child. DERIVATIVES scampish adjective. ORIGIN originally denoting a highwayman: from obsolete scamp «rob on the highway», probably from Dutch schampen slip away …   English terms dictionary

  • scamp — scamp1 [skamp] n. [< obs. scamp, to roam; akin to SCAMPER] a mischievous fellow; rascal scampish adj. scamp2 [skamp] vt. [akin to or < ON skammr, short < IE base * (s)k̑em , stunted > OE hamola, man with cropped hair] to make, do, or… …   English World dictionary

  • scamp — index degenerate, derelict, malefactor Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • scamp — [ skæmp ] noun count INFORMAL OLD FASHIONED someone, especially a child, who behaves badly but is difficult to dislike …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • scamp — *villain, scoundrel, blackguard, knave, rascal, rogue, rapscallion, miscreant Analogous words: malefactor, culprit, delinquent, *criminal …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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